Wednesday, 30 June 2010

Winter days

Yesterday was a cold, wet, miserable day.  John went to Gawler to a meeting,  Chris stayed in bed and so I set the fire in the living room,  had a shower and washed my hair and avoided the garden and any other outside activities.  I wasn't sulking,  just practical!
I spent the day drying my hair, knitting socks and reading John Bellamy Foster.... (more about that later)...
.... and I'm glad that I did!

Later, John arrived home from Gawler with some seedlings....
... it's a cut-off pot with broccoli, peas, lettuce and parsley that someone in Gawler starts for low income people who apply for help at an agency there.  These were left over and rescued by John.  This seems like a really good means of helping people to be a little more independent though... self sufficient and just a little bit more in control of things.  An interesting contribution to the usual "food parcel" for those needing help.


I was out again this morning though....  first thing was to look at the jonquils... and they are looking lovelier by the day....
... and one of them is about to open....

The current vegetable patch looks like a jungle.....

In the old patch where the cabbages are it seems that things are going well too....
... it never ceases to amaze me that these leaves "know" how to curl around into a "cabbage" shape.  I understand the heredity and how it is transmitted and how the cascading effect of genes and their associated traits work,  but I am still amazed when I see the cabbage leaves curl around in the right way to provide me with a cabbage head.

Today I planted a few more seedings in another part of the garden.  (One needs to plant constantly if one wants to eat regularly.)  I found a few unexpected potatoes.  Not enough for us for dinner,  but something to add to it,  nevertheless.  With all of this cold and miserable weather and all of us having those "hibernation" feelings,  it's time for kitchari with mung dahl and winter spices.  And here are the beginnings.... broccoli (again!) and the potatoes and the garlic tops...
... I also picked the leeks that had grown from the "snapped off" ones from last year.  (I showed one of these clumps recently.)
Here are two...  the one without roots is the one that I photographed previously and, as it was amongst a group of others,  I cut it off carefully.... no roots left....
... and the other one was all by itself,  so I pulled it up by the roots....   with it came three tiny leek plants that looked like seedlings from the nursery.  I am not convinced,  as these babies might think that they are "second year plants" and might still go to seed very soon.  I'm not sure.  (Genetics and programming again!)  I have transplanted them into a new spot and I'll see how they develope.  This is part of the excitement of gardening and producing food.   But I suppose one has to be amused by the real world rather than television or trendier happenings.

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