Wednesday, 7 July 2010

Light Regional Council

This evening, I will have a Development Application Assessment meeting and so I have had to drive around the council area to view a number of sites.  I'm aware that people find this a bit of a drag,  but I really enjoy the site visits, especially when the weather is good and I end up in places that I don't see very often.
On the way today,  I drove through many paddocks of newly germinated crops....

... this is exactly the kind of land that our council policies are written to protect...  land that produces grain for consumption by people in the city who never imagine what it takes to produce those calories.

And on I went through vines, some needing pruning and some already done...
... and beside these....  a wild rose growing....
I went to have a look at it and the flowers are beautiful.... and the bees are busy....
The "dog roses"  that are all along the sides of the road have rosehips on them,  but they have completely gone into "winter" mode now.  This is some kind of hybrid that has escaped from a garden.
The perfume of these roses was so strong that I could smell them even as I crossed the road.
I was being watched as I photographed the flowers...
..... and behind are the Nain Hills with remnant native bush.

On the road again and this is Branson Rd...  one of the kind of roads that I love to paint or draw....
... the photograph doesn't include the screeching lorikeets or the parrots,  but I saw them!

Back towards Kapunda through huge vistas of germinating crops....  it feels so comforting to know that all of this food production is so close to home.

Further down Branson Rd, an olive grove...
... and nearer to Kapunda,  the sheep paddocks....
... looking green and healthy.

Once home,  I put my stolen roses (from the side of the road) into a vase and already the kitchen is perfumed as if incense was burning....
In the future,  pesticides, phosphate and fertilisers of all sorts will become expensive,  making rotation of crops with the inclusion of grazing animals while fields are "fallow" along with the newer low-till methods of farming will become more necessary...  perhaps this little corner of the world is a good place to be.

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