Wednesday, 12 September 2012

Bits and pieces from the spring garden

I have been doing some spring planting as the days get longer and the soil is getting warmer.  The last couple of days have been lovely,  but the weather bureau has been predicting rain, so I have put some new seedlings into the soil.  Tonight, right on time, the gentle rain is watering  those baby plants.

In recent days I have kept up to date with taking photographs, if not blog posts....  during the sunny days,  the bees have been busy.... with the borage....
 .... and the rosemary....

The coriander is going to seed at quite a rate.  Most of it I will leave now.  The seeds are useful for cooking,  and not only that, they will provide another crop during the winter next year.


These tiny buds are on a native daisy plant that was thought to be dead at the local nursery.  Often I am given those plants (that are thought to be dead)  in order to give them a chance....
 .... these seem to have done well.

The pond plants are growing again also.   The floating "duck weed" is growing fast,  but the lily leaves are emerging too...
 ....still no lily buds,  but I'm checking regularly.

This little patch of the garden is where,  last autumn,  I threw a few handfuls of "outdated" seeds.  Some of these were seeds that I had saved and some were "out of date" commercial seeds.  I threw these into a patch of garden where they seem to have done well....
.
 ... and amongst the survivors are these....
 ... coriander, parsley and silver beet.

It is also very close to the spot that Ebony loves to rest during the day....


Inside,  the sauerkraut (made from the surplus cabbages from the garden) is doing well....


...and the first cabbage flower has finally opened in the cabbage that has been trying to go to seed for some time....
 ... the flowers are yellow (not white, as I had wondered) and very similar to the seeds of the kale that I will actually keep for next year....
 ... this means pulling out the cabbage (for the chickens) so that I don't get any hybrid brassicas.  I'd rather just have kale seeds for the garden next year.

The broad beans are close to edible size....
 and I will check the artichoke plants for buds.  Artichokes and broad beans always appear together.

As I weeded the potato patch,  I found a baby lettuce plant...
 .... this must be self sown.  It is close to where many of  last summer's lettuces grew, and some did go to seed.  I don't usually grown much in the way of lettuce during the summer.  They are better suited to the winter climate and besides,  I prefer cucumber in my summer salads, and I planted several cucumber seedlings today.

This is one of the last broccoli plants from the oldest patch.  This plant is about 18 months old and has produced broccoli flowerets for most of that time.  I did add some goat manure, multi-minerals and seasol to the plants, but now that the new batch are producing well,  I will pull these last couple of old plants out.
It seems a bit sad really.  At first they produced the big full broccoli heads and then the regular side shoots.  As the weather got colder,  the side shoots became less frequent,  but just as good.  As the winter ended, production increased again, and these several plants have kept me in "green vegetables" for quite some time, until the new crop got going,  and I do feel a little sad to pull them out, disloyal really.  The chickens will enjoy them.  Green leafy vegetables seem to make the chickens' egg yolks very dark, and so there is not much to be missed  

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