Thursday, 6 June 2013

Self-sown gifts from the garden

Today's harvest... small but enough for dinner...
 ... I picked some flowers too.  They were hanging out over the pathway and so I "pruned" the bush... the red salvia  (I think it's a Huntington's red, from memory,  though I am not 100% certain.)

I gave the goats another bale of hay today and "stole" two barrow loads of "leftovers, incuding goat poo, for the potatoes that are growing well...
As I have commented previously,  potatoes seem to do best here in winter.  We do get slight frosts occasionally (though none since mid 2011) and that can slow them down.  However,  they really need more water than one can supply in summer.  It isn't possible to buy seed potatoes in the autumn (they won't be available until about August... just before spring)  and so I either keep my own, and these have been fairly successful with only a few diseased tubers which I have burned.  Otherwise,  I buy seed potatoes and keep those in the refrigerator until the end of summer. they don't seem to mind being in suspended animation for that time.

The broad beans are well and truly up.   As I commented a few weeks ago,  I didn't plant them in April, as I usually do as the weather was still too hot and dry.  I don't think it makes much difference to them.  They will grow well enough even when planted in the winter around here.
 This broad bean plant (below) is another self-sown one.  I had found a couple of those when I planted the seeds  this year,  and this is another....  right beside a garlic plant and some snow peas...  broccoli behind....

More self-sown plants,  these are some self-sown parsley plants....  hundreds of them...
 The gap in the middle is where I pulled out the parent plant a week or so ago,  just to let the sage plant have a bit of space.  I still have plenty of parsley....
 .... all self sown and healthy.  Once again, it is easy to see why tobouleh is such a mediterranean staple.
The old parsley plants are still flowering....
 ... and the bees are still enjoying them.

Coriander is coming up now too.....  all self-sown and where it is too thick,  I have been transplanting clumps to little bare spots among the vegetables...
 ... and self-sown lettuces....
 ... even a lettuce plant in the onion patch!


My "rescued" leeks and onions are doing well....
 ... these were poor dying punnets of seedlings that were being dumped for a dollar each.  I soaked them in seaweed solution and planted them out.
They all seem to have survived.  Onions and leeks are the kind of plants that are definitely worth rescuing from the rubbish heap.

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